James Marsh : Man on Wire ☆☆☆☆・

先月になりますが、バルタバス「シャーマン」と同じく、エルメスギャラリーで観てきました。
Philippe Petit一味のドキュメンタリー。こんな格好いい連中が現代にもいたんですね。
綱渡りは最近、slackliningなんていうキーワードで日本でも流行らそうとしている方々がいらっしゃるようで…。ちょっとやってみたい気もします。

Native New Yorkers know to expect the unexpected, but who among them could’ve predicted that a man would stroll between the towers of the World Trade Center? French high-wire walker Philippe Petit did just that on August 7th, 1974. Petits success may come as a foregone conclusion, but British filmmaker James Marshs pulse-pounding documentary still plays more like a thriller than a non-fiction entry–in fact, it puts most thrillers to shame. Marsh (Wisconsin Death Trip, The King) starts by looking at Petit’s previous stunts. First, he took on Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral, then Sydney’s Harbour Bridge before honing in on the not-yet-completed WTC. The planning took years, and the prescient Petit filmed his meetings with accomplices in France and America. Marsh smoothly integrates this material with stylized re-enactments and new interviews in which participants emerge from the shadows as if to reveal deep, dark secrets which, in a way, they do, since Petit’s plan was illegal, “but not wicked or mean.” The director documents every step they took to circumvent security, protocol, and physics as if re-creating a classic Jules Dassin or Jean-Pierre Melville caper. Though still photographs capture the feat rather than video, the resulting images will surely blow as many minds now as they did in the 1970s when splashed all over the media. Not only did Petit walk, he danced and even lay down on the cable strung between the skyscrapers. Based on his 2002 memoir, Man on Wire defines the adjective “awe-inspiring.” –Kathleen C. Fennessy


— 追記 —
6月13日からテアトルタイムズスクウェアで上映されるみたいです。
お見逃しの方は是非。
HP「マン・オン・ワイヤー」